The T Sector: RIP

Tuesday, October 5, 2004, 18:51 —by Joe Crawford
This item was posted in San Diego News and Local Media category and has 2 Comments so far.

Looks like The T Sector, at one time “Everything Tech San Diego — Magazine, Web, Events”has bit the dust. You can try and view previous versions of thetsector.com on the web archiving site web.archive.org.

Anyone have the inside scoop of the dying of this paper magazine? Can San Diego no longer sustain a technology-based magazine?

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2 Responses to “The T Sector: RIP”

  1. route66 said on Wednesday, October 6, 2004, 17:03

    SDUT article from summer of 2003:

    S.D.’s T Sector Magazine making major cutbacks

    June 19, 2003

    The cratering tech economy has claimed more victims.

    The T Sector Magazine, which was launched in the wake of the New Economy boom
    and focused on San Diego County’s emerging technology businesses, laid off most
    of its editorial staff this week and said it would limit the number of issues it
    would publish in the future.

    “It’s just unfortunate that the publishing world is what it is today,” said
    Larry Edwards, the magazine’s editor until yesterday.

    Despite laying off most of its editorial staff, Katherine Harrington, the
    co-owner and founder of The T Sector, said the company still hopes to publish an
    issue bimonthly or quarterly. In addition, the company will focus on industry
    networking events and continue to publish a daily e-mail newsletter.

    “Really it will be business as usual,” Harrington said. “Internally it will look
    different, but externally it will appear the same.”

    The troubles plaguing The T Sector, the only local publication that focuses
    exclusively on the area’s technology companies, are hardly unique. Many of the
    magazines developed amid the mania that surrounded the dot-com era have vanished
    like the companies they once covered. Such high-profile national publications as
    the Industry Standard and Red Herring closed up shop as their advertising
    evaporated.

    Even the formidable Wall Street Journal and its parent company, Dow Jones, have
    seen ad revenue dwindle as technology companies have cut back on spending. Since
    2001, Dow Jones has laid off 1,000 employees and left hundreds of positions
    vacant, according to a report by The Washington Post.

    The real surprise is not that The T Sector has experienced a setback but that
    the magazine held on as long as it did, said Tyler Orion, executive director of
    the San Diego Regional Technology Alliance, a nonprofit that supports technology
    start-ups.

    “I was really, really disappointed to hear about it,” Orion said. “But I have to
    say I was amazed that they’ve lasted as long as they did given the economy.”

    This was not how it was supposed to turn out. Conceived in the early part of
    2000, The T Sector was envisioned by the husband and wife team of Robert and
    Katherine Harrington as a prototype publication for other emerging tech markets
    such as Austin and Phoenix. But by the time the magazine published its first
    issue in November 2000, the tech economy was in a swoon. As the technology
    sector failed to rebound in 2001, plans to expand into new markets were scrapped
    and key employees were laid off.

    “Reality is reality,” said Katherine Harrington about the tough economic times
    and the layoffs of four key editorial staffers.

    The triple whammy of the telecom bust, the September 11 attacks and the war in
    Iraq left the company no choice but to cut key staff. Fearing the impending war,
    companies did not budget for branding campaigns or print ads this year,
    Katherine Harrington said. Instead local companies were more interested in
    sponsoring networking events, which The T Sector will continue to organize and
    promote.

    But Orion said the monthly technology publication will be missed.

    “It was more symbolic,” he said. “It was so meaningful for San Diego to have its
    own technology publication.”

    But The T Sector’s struggles shouldn’t be taken as a measure of the health of
    San Diego’s technology scene, she added.

    “I wouldn’t point to San Diego,” Orion said. “Is there any emerging technology
    economy that can support a specialty publication?”

  2. laura keys said on Sunday, May 11, 2008, 16:12

    i have a 2002 issue and I am identical look alike to katherine harrington. I would like to contact her; can anyone help me.
    Laura Keys

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